Ruby, our southern belle

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Ruby when she could walk

Ruby came to us two years ago and boy does time fly!  Ruby’s parents had fallen on bad times from serious health issues.  Ruby couldn’t walk or go potty on her own which made it hard for her parents to care for her.  I arranged transport for her to come from NC to OH via some wonderful dog lovers.  What a beauty she was!  Ruby is what is called a pie bald and she has a pink spotted belly.

 

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pink belly!

Isn’t she gorgeous!  We call her out southern belle because she looks at you with a look that lets you know is a lady.  She has her moments though.  If one of her siblings is laying where she wants to sleep she will stare at them until they move.  And they do move!

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nap time

Two of her siblings, Butch and Roo, make therapy visits locally.  We took Ruby once just so people could meet her and now she is included in all of the visits.  She even got her own ID!

Ruby’s brothers also race in their carts so why not?  Girls can do anything boys can do.  Right?  She’s a big hit when she shows up in her tutu.  Ruby also goes with her brothers when we teach people about handicapped dogs.

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Isn’t she beautiful!

She’s a beautiful girl and we are so happy she is here.  I’m sure people that meet her and her brothers now know that these babies are not handicapped, they’re handicapable.

 

 

 

 

 

Abbie Marie, we still miss you

Abbie was the cutest little dog.  Her mom was a golden retriever and her dad was a pomeranian.  They belonged to our neighbors and they had such a cute litter of pups that we couldn’t resist her.  My daughter would carry her everywhere she went.  We tried to take Abbie for walks but we would always end up carrying her back home.  She was truly in charge!

When we adopted Abbie we also had a 9 year old border collie named Punkin.  Punkin would tolerate little Abbie but eventually they became true siblings.   Abbie would tag behind her like a little sister and Punkin would cuddle up around Abbie at night.  They really were cute together.  Unfortunately when Punkin was about 13 years old she developed cancer and Abbie would lay by her side on a blanket just to be near her.  When Punkin passed away her little sister was lonesome.  Dogs feel emotion just like we do and it was so sad watching Abbie adjust to being an “only child”.

Punkin

I was watching tv one night and saw dogs on the news from local shelters.  There was a dog named Lucky that looked like a larger version of Punkin.  My daughter and I called and put out names on the list to adopt him.  We didn’t hear anything for a a couple of weeks so we thought someone else had been picked to be Lucky’s new family.  Then we got the call that a lady would bring him to the house to see if we were a good fit!  We were so excited and worried that he wouldn’t like us, but he did.  He came through the door with his guardian, walked up to Abbie’s bowl and started eating and drinking.  Abbie walked right over to him and started kissing him!  I think he reminded her of Punkin, too.

Lucky was renamed Quazimoto and we called him Quazi for short.  Quazi had been found as a stray and had to have one of his eyes removed.  When we would take them for walks Abbie would walk on his sightless side and nudge him to go straight.  She really took care of the big guy.  He weighed about 115 pounds to her 12 yet she was his caretaker.

Abbie and Quazi

For those of us that remember the tv show MY THREE SONS, Abbie looked like a miniature Tramp.    And she was devoted to me.  Abbie never left the yard unless I did.  One day a friend took her for a walk to the neighbors house and she chewed her way thru the leash and came home to sit on the porch because I was in the house.   We would take her swimming in the lake and she was just like a little kid.  It would be time to go home and as we were leaving the beach she would turn around and run right back into the water!  When she was wet she looked like she weighed 3 pounds.  Quazi would walk the beach picking up dead fish and carrying them around.  No water for him!

Quazimoto was with us for 4 years and we found out he had cancer.  The big guy went from just over 100 pounds to 70.  He went to the Bridge and Abbie Marie was alone once again.

The next furry angel to come into our lives was Mindy May.  Mindy May was a 13 year old, one eyed Shih Tzu.  Another one-eyed dog for Abbie!  As with Quazi, Abbie would walk on Mindy’s sightless side and nudge her when we went for walks.  She really was a service dog to these dogs.   Mindy May was diagnosed with canine cognitive disorder (doggie alzheimer’s) and Abbie would help her find her way around the house and yard.  Mindy May passed away at the age of 18.

Abbie lived to be 18 years old.  She had a wonderful life and she brought so much love and joy to ours.  She loved and was loved.  Who can ask for more?

We still miss you, Abbie Marie

Butch

When I decided I needed another dog I began looking on petfinder for photos of dachshunds.   I found a cutie and was directed to the DRNA website.  I fell in love with Butch.  I still get teary eyed when I think about seeing him.  I wasn’t sure I could take care of him the way he needed to be taken care of so I emailed with Dona, his foster mom, several times just to make sure.  I didn’t want to adopt him and find out I couldn’t do him justice.  He required therapy and he was getting that where he was.  What if I brought him to Ohio and I couldn’t keep it up?  What if I failed him and he really needed me to step up?  Dona explained that he would need ongoing therapy but he would be one of a few at my house and he would get more attention.  She had several fosters and some of them needed therapy also.  He really does love attention and believe me he demands it!

How cute is he!

I met Butch and Dona in July at the North East Ohio Dachshund Picnic.  He was so cute and cuddly looking but he didn’t want to leave Dona.  She had to walk a little ways with us so he thought she was coming with us.  Eventually we broke away and walked around the park checking out the vendors.  At one point I took him out of his cart and couldn’t figure out how to get him back in!  I had to go back and find Dona so she could teach me how to put him in it.

As we were heading to the car a couple with a cart dog came up to me and we started talking about Butch and their dog Denny.   We exchanged emails and I am so grateful that we did.   Jay and Terie were so helpful to me with tips on taking care of him from baths to belly bands to expressing his bladder.  Without their input and Dona’s encouragement I really don’t know how I could have done it.  We all need help and I am so appreciative of the help I’ve received.   I’ve listed my information on DODGERSLIST so I can help others.  It really is easy to take care of a handicapped dog if you know where to find the information.

Butch is the easiest dog to travel with.  He loves to ride in the car in his basket and usually sleeps for hours on end.  When we stop at a hotel we don’t have to walk him in the middle of the night.  We express him in the bathroom!  The funny thing about traveling with Butch is that when we stop at rest areas he gets to “stretch his legs”.  He gets in his cart and we let him run around and sniff everything.

Stretching his legs at a rest area

Butch races in dachshund races and so far is the champ . . . at least in the races he’s entered.  We’ve met so many wonderful people because of this sweet weenie.  We met Tim, Judy and their cart dog Sam at the National Dachshund Races in Findlay three years ago and have become great friends.   We travel to Florida for races and stay with them and they stay with us in Ohio.  Last year when we were at their house they had a doxie picnic with all of their rescue friends from DARE.  We had games and races for the dogs and met some really fun people.

Party time!

Butch still goes for therapy occasionally.  He isn’t too thrilled with the water treadmill therapy or the acupuncture but he needs to go to keep his muscles strong.  He can stand but only takes one or two steps and then tips over.  His left leg just can’t support him.  But we don’t care and neither does he.  He doesn’t have a clue that he’s any different than any other dog.  But we know that he’s special.

My sweet Butch